Posts in Care & Handling
I used to have a brown thumb.

Let’s be honest, it was black. I killed everything...Spiderwort, Pothos, even Peace Lilies wern’t safe around me.

Summer+Garden+Planter

What made this funny was that I come from a long line of plant people. My parents had a nursery. My grandparents had a nursery. My cousin. My Aunts & Uncles. Yep—pretty much everyone I grew up with grew plants.  But me, I just killed them. (This, by the way, is part of why I fell in love with flowers...once cut, they had a limited lifetime. Measured in days, my bad ju-ju wouldn’t have a chance to kick in.)

You know what changed? I realized that I could always buy a new plant when the old one died.

And just like that, I quit killing my plants!

You can order your very own plant HERE.

Enjoy! :D

Caring for Your Poinsettias

Remember when caring for your poinsettias that they are a tropical plant. They are accustomed to the tropical climate of Southern Mexico. There are a few things to know about caring for these tropical plants:

·

         - 

They like direct sunlight. It is ideal to keep your plants in 6 hours of direct sunlight every day. But take care to keep them from getting too close to cold windows.

·

      -   

Keep them in temperature from 65-75 degrees F during the day and no lower than 55 degrees at night. They like the slightly lower temperatures at night.

·

         -

Water the plant when the soil is dry to the touch. Water until the excess water drains from the plant. Do not let the plant sit in this excess water.

·

         -

Make sure your plants are not in the path of a warm or cold breeze from radiators, windows or open doors. This breeze will hurt the plant and any direct contact with too high or too low temperatures will hurt the plant as well. Do not let your plant touch a cold window.*

Follow these few tips and your poinsettias should last long past the holiday season.

*

http://urbanext.illinois.edu/poinsettia/care.cfm

How to Care for Your Cut Flower Arrangement

Fresh arrangements are beautiful but they are not meant to last. Florists have a few tricks up their sleeves to help cut flowers last a little longer.

1.       Make sure to check the water level in your flowers every day. An arrangement with many flowers will pull lots of water and some flowers are very “thirsty” and go through water faster than others.

2.       Replace the water in your arrangements every 3 days. When the water becomes cloudy, change the water. If your florist sends a package of floral food with the arrangement, it should be added to the vase when water is replaced. (Follow the directions on the package for best results.) You can also pick up floral food at your florist to help prolong your flowers.

3.       Some flowers last longer than others. If a flower or foliage is dead in the arrangement, remove it. This will help the remaining flowers look fresher.

4.       Florists keep flowers in coolers until they are sold. Heat accelerated the dying process, so keep your flowers away from heaters, heat producing appliances and direct sunlight.

5.       Recut the stems of the flowers. A fresh cut will help the flower absorb the nutrients it needs to survive.

6.       Mist the arrangement with water. A lite mist will help hydrate the petals and leaves of the flowers.

Remember flowers are not meant to last forever. Even if the flower is never cut from the plant, it will eventually fade and die.